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Kathleen Jacobitz
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Dick Taylor


Lewis Marsh Rogers

This informative sketch is from Portrait & Biographical Album of Johnson and Pawnee Counties Nebraska published by Chapman Bros., Chicago, 1889. (p. 567) 

LEWIS MARSH ROGERS.  The property comprising the Rogers estate is considered among the most valuable in Pawnee County.  The home farm is a finely cultivated tract of land with a commodious frame dwelling a large stone barn, and first-class improvements generally.  It is at once recognized as the result of industry and perseverance, with the supervision of a mind more than ordinarily intelligent.  He who first labored in the subduing of the soil, and later superintended its operations, is now no more, but he has left a monument more enduring than brass, the record of an upright life, fruitful with kindly deeds and honest purposes. 

The subject of this record was born in Tennessee, April 11, 1837, and was the son of Hon. P. M. Rogers, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume.  His early life was spent amid the peaceful pursuits of agriculture, and his studies were conducted in the common school.  When a young man twenty years of age he came with the balance of the family to Nebraska Territory, they locating on a tract of land in Clay Precinct, which is now occupied by Robert Scott, a son-in-law, who is also written of on another page. 

When past twenty-four years of age, Mr. Rogers formed matrimonial ties, being wedded to Miss Mary E., daughter of Francis and Dulcena (Ride) Burg, Sept. 19, 1861.  Mrs. Rogers was born in Shelby County, Ind., March 14, 1842.  The young people soon afterward commenced housekeeping in a modest dwelling upon the land now occupied by the widow and her children.  After they had spent twenty years together Mr. Rogers was called to his long home, Dec. 3, 1881, greatly mourned by his family and by all who knew him.  He was a man possessing a well-poised mind, combining executive and constructive ability in a marked degree.  His eminent fitness for positions of trust and responsibility was recognized by his townsmen at an early day, and after discharging the duties of the various local offices he was made a County Commissioner, the duties of which position he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to all concerned. 

Mr. Rogers was particularly interested in bring the educational system of his adopted State to a high standing, and labored strenuously for the measures which would guarantee enlightenment to all.  A Republican in politics, he fearlessly advocated the principles of his party, of which he was a leader in many local contests.  He not only advocated patriotism, but made practical application of his principles during the progress of the Civil War, enlisted as a private soldier in Company H, 2nd Nebraska Cavalry, and serving nine months, being promoted to Sergeant.  He was honorably discharged Dec. 23, 1863. 

Remarkably successful in business affairs, Mr. Rogers left at this death 592 acres of valuable land thoroughly improved, thus insuring his family against want.  To him and his estimable wife there were born eight children, namely: Francis M., William S., Mary A., George H., Sarah K., Dulcena A., Charles L. and Edward C.   As a husband and father Mr. Rogers presented a model to the world.  He was kind, devoted and affectionate, and looked up to by the members of his household with that consideration which every father of a family should exert himself to be worthy of. 

Mrs. Rogers in former years was a member of the Christian Church, to which she was ardently attached, but of late years has been unable to actively participate in church work, though her zeal in the Master's cause is as earnest now as in the days of her youth.  She is a lady possessing admirable traits of character, and is the daughter of Francis H. Burg, who was born in Germany, and accompanied his parents, Francis and Mary Burg, to America in 1832.  They settled first in Shelby County, Ind., where the elder Burg died ten years later, in 1843.  His widow came to the West in 1870 and settled in this county, making her home with a grandson, where her death took place Feb. 6, 1883, at the advanced age of ninety-four years. 

Mr. Burg was married in Shelby County, Ind., to Miss Dulcena rice, a native of Kentucky, and the daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Rice.  The latter left the Blue Grass region in 1858, coming to this county and taking up 160 acres of land in Clay Precinct.  Mr. Burg died Aug. 14, 1863, while on a freighting expedition to the farther West.  He had served as Justice of the Peace in Clay Precinct, and with his excellent wife was a member of the Christian Church.  They were the parents of twelve children; Mary E., Mrs. Rogers; William R., John W.; Julia A.; the wife of Andrew Scott, of his county; Maggie, Mrs. Robert Inglis, of Clay Precinct; Michael R., Lavina, Cassandra and Alice, the wife of John Blaine.  George died at the age of eighteen years, Sarah when three years, and Dora when seven months old. 

Transcribed for this site by Dick Taylor, 1999.


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